Girl Guiding


At Perivale Wood, you can bring your guiding group for an environmental education session to help them complete one of their badges. The sessions are delivered by our environmental science teachers and forest school practitioners.

A two-hour session costs £5 per child.

During your visit, you have use of our Bluebell Centre, which includes a classroom for 30 children, a boot room to store any belongings and toilets. Many of the sessions take place in the Central Clearing, which is in the middle of the woodland where there is a habitat area complete with a bug hotel and log seating area. We also use the wildflower meadow and pond areas during late spring, summer and autumn.

Summaries for each session can be found below.

Rainbows

Growing up wild paw prints

Winter

Rainbows can come to Perivale Wood during the winter and carry out various activities to complete their winter paw print. They could go for a walk around the wood looking for signs of winter and perhaps looking for footprints in the mud. While on the walk they could collect natural materials to make into a decoration. At the end of the session they could toast marshmallows around a campfire. If they were lucky enough to come on a day when it has snowed, the Rainbows could make snow angels and look at snowflakes with hand lenses and under a microscope.

Outdoor homes

Rainbows can explore the outdoor homes found within Perivale Wood. They can look for slow worms under corrugated sheets and see whether they can find the entrance to a foxes den. Within the wood they can investigate the minibeast area where we have a bug hotel, stag beetle habitat and giant wormery! They could then have a go at making a shelters using natural material for a cuddly toy they have brought to the wood.

Birds

Rainbows can come to Perivale Wood and enjoy a session learning about birds. This is best done in March/April when the birds are nesting. Rainbows can look for birds coming into and out of the nest boxes and can help the birds by putting out natural nesting material for them. Rainbows can also make a pine cone bird feeder to take home and could have a go at building a giant birds nest!

In the woods

Perivale Wood is the perfect location to complete the Woodland Paw Print. There are many, many different activities we could do with Rainbows. For example, we could begin with a scavenger hunt through the woods, looking for signs of animals and different natural items.

Rainbows could then investigate the invertebrates that live within the wood in our minibeast area. They could end the session by making a pine cone bird feeder to take home or by planting an acorn (which they could bring back to the wood to plant when it is a sapling if desired).

In the Spring

Perivale Wood is stunning in the spring as thousands of bluebells begin to bloom. Rainbows can come to the wood and go on a bluebell walk. They could also play a game of colour bingo and build a shelter using natural materials for a cuddly toy they’ve brought along.

In the Autmn

An autumn Rainbows session would begin a walk through the crunchy leaves to our story circle. Then either we could read ‘Stick Man’ and then the Rainbows could make their own stick man, or we could read ‘Leaf Man’ and the Rainbows could make their own leaf man! The Rainbows could then have a go at making their own elf house using natural materials, or they could have a game of hide and seek.

Insects and minibeasts

Perivale Wood is a great place to investigate insects and minibeasts. We could begin with a minibeast song session in the meadow and then either investigate the creatures that live in the wild flower meadow using sweep nets and pooters or we could investigate the creatures that live in the minibeast area in the woodland. We have a bug hotel, a stag beetle habitat and a giant wormery in the woodland. Or we could do a mixture of both habitats! We could finish the session by making a wormery for the Rainbows to take home.

Brownies

Seasons badge

At Perivale Wood we can help Brownies complete their Seasons Badge.

Spring

Brownies will begin the session by going on a walk through the reserve looking for signs of spring. This will include common wild flowers and different types of bee. They will also look for signs of baby animals, such as frog spawn or tadpoles and nest making. They will help the nesting birds by putting fine hair around the reserve. Back at the Education Centre they will make pine cone bird feeders to take home and will work together to make a nest box which can be put up in Perivale Wood for the blue tits. Brownies can also have the opportunity to make a rain gauge to take home.

Summer

Brownies will learn about the butterflies, bees and insects that are found in the wild flower meadow at Perivale Wood. They may have the chance to carry out the Big Butterfly Count, which takes place mid July to the beginning of August. They will use sweep nets and pooters to sample the insect life found in the meadow and can also carry out the UK ladybird survey. The insects will inspire the Brownies when they paint their own terracotta bird bath to take home. While carrying out this craft activity the Brownies will also try three different types of honey (including our very own Perivale Wood honey!) and will vote on their favourite. There is also a chance that the Brownies will be able to view an observation bee hive to learn about how honey is made.

Autumn

Brownies will explore the woodland looking for fallen natural objects, which they will use to make a collage. They will also do some bark rubbings which will form the background to their collage. If the timing is right the Brownies will also collect some blackberries and hazelnuts (if there are no Brownies with nut allergies) and will make some flapjacks back at the Education Centre. If time allows, the Brownies can also view a hedgehog skeleton and slow worm, both of which are examples of animals that hibernate. This will help the Brownies to learn about hibernating animals for their poster or scrapbook.

Winter

Brownies will begin the session with a winter nature hunt with spotter sheet. Back at the Education Centre they will make a pine cone bird feeder to take home and plant a spring bulb to also take home.

Wildlife Explorer Badge

Depending on the needs of the Brownies and the season, we can do the following activities at Perivale Wood to help the Brownies complete their wildlife Explorer badge:

  1. The Brownies can explore the wild flower meadow and possibly take part in the Big Butterfly Count, which takes place mid-July to the beginning of August. They could also use sweep nets and pooters to investigate the invertebrates found in the meadow. They can take part in the UK lady bird survey.
  2. The Brownies can make a pine cone bird feeder to take home.
  3. The reserve can be used for the RSPB Big Garden Bird watch. Note this takes place in January.
    Brownies can have a pond dipping session. They have the opportunity to do the OPAL pond survey. The results are put onto the national database for scientists to learn more about the wildlife found in UK ponds.
  4. Brownies can explore the trees of Perivale Wood. They’ll learn to identify the common trees that are found in the wood and will take leaf and bark rubbings of some of the trees. This is best done in the spring and summer.

Out and about badge

At Perivale Wood, we can help Brownies complete their Out and About Badge.

Brownies will come to the wood suitably dressed for walking in a wild environment. They will bring a rucksack containing suitable items, such as water and sun cream. Brownies will be shown a map of the reserve and will go on a walk through the reserve demonstrating that they can use the map. Perivale Wood is the perfect location for Brownies to plan and carry out a treasure hunt or scavenger hunt, so once they are confident that they can find their way around the reserve they will then carry out this activity.

Growing up wild paw prints

Winter

Brownies can come to Perivale Wood during the winter and carry out various activities to complete their winter paw print. They could go for a walk around the wood looking for signs of winter and perhaps looking for footprints in the mud. While on the walk they could collect natural materials to make into a table decoration. At the end of the session they could toast marshmallows around a campfire. If they were lucky enough to come on a day when it has snowed, the Brownies could make snow angels and snow sculptures and have a snowball throwing competition.

Summer

This session would be based in the wild flower meadow at Perivale Wood. The Brownies would explore the invertebrates in the long grass with sweep nets and pooters, trying to identify what they have found. They will then make a butterfly nectar feeder and watch to see if it attracts any butterflies. While they are watching their nectar feeder they can make a grass tweeter.

Outdoor homes

Brownies can explore the outdoor homes found within Perivale Wood. They can look for slow worms under corrugated sheets and see whether they can find the entrance to a foxes den. Within the wood they can look for bird boxes and investigate the minibeast area where we have a bug hotel, stag beetle habitat and giant wormery!

Birds

Brownies can take part in a bird themed session at Perivale Wood to earn their Birds paw print. This session is best done in nesting season. The brownies can walk through the wood looking at the bird boxes and signs of nesting. They can then put natural nesting material around the reserve for the birds to use. They can observe some nests from the previous year to see what materials the birds use to build their nests. The Brownies can spend 5 minutes looking for birds with binoculars and then attempt to build their own birds nest in one of the trees. They can also look for feathers and will learn to identify common birds found in the Perivale Wood.

In the woods

Perivale Wood is the perfect location for Brownies to complete their In the Woods paw print. We can organise a session based on any of the activity ideas suggested on the Growing up Wild website. For example, we could have a tree themed session. The Brownies could take part in the Treezilla (http://treezilla.org/) survey. This involves identifying a tree and making some observations such as circumference and calculating its height to put onto a national database. They could them make some bark rubbing art and if the season is right they could collect a seed from their tree to plant. When sturdy enough the Brownies could come back to the wood to plant their sapling. Brownies are always welcome to join our Rangers club at Perivale Wood. This is our children’s nature club held once a month on the second Saturday of the month from 2-4pm.

For example, in October the theme is fungi and Brownies are welcome to come and join our fungi hunt through Perivale Wood.

In the Spring

Spring is a beautiful time to visit Perivale Wood as the reserve is transformed with the blooming of thousands of bluebells in April. Brownies can go on a spring scavenger hunt looking for signs of spring such as tadpoles, blossom, bursting buds and spring flowers. They can put out some natural nesting material to help the nesting birds and could even have a go at building their own nest.

In the Autumn

Autumn is a magical time in Perivale Wood. The leaves are turning, the squirrels are collecting acorns and hazelnuts for the winter and the fungi are coming up everywhere. Brownies can take part in a fungi hunt through the wood and hunt for acorns and hazelnuts. They can plant the seeds either in pots to take away or within the wood. The session can end with a campfire and toasting marshmallows and possibly a quick game of hide and seek!

In mud

Playing with mud is always fun and Brownies can take part in mud themed activities at Perivale Wood. For example, they could look for worms and other creatures that live in the mud and then use the mud to either build a bird’s nest or to create a natural sculpture using mud as a base. Alternatively, Brownies could go on a muddy treasure hunt through the wood!

Insects and minibeasts

There are many different activities that Brownies could do at Perivale Wood to earn their Insects and Minibeasts paw prints. We have our own minibeast area with bug hotel, stag beetle habitat and giant wormery. They can investigate the minibeasts that live in this area and learn to identify them. Alternatively, they could take part in the UK Ladybird survey by catching ladybirds with sweep nets and identifying them. And they could take part in the Big Butterfly Count in the meadow. In addition, Brownies could focus on pond life and take part in the OPAL pond dipping survey to find out how healthy the ponds at Perivale Wood are.

Perivale Wood Rangers

Girl Guides

Survival badge

At Perivale Wood we can help Guides to complete their Survival Badge. Initially, Guides could plan a route to reach Perivale Wood Local Nature Reserve using a street map. Once at the reserve Guides can take part in a den building session to build an emergency shelter using coppiced hazel, rope and sheets. During the session, Guides will also have the chance to find 3 edible plants within the reserve and 3 that are non-edible.

Growing up wild paw prints

Winter

At Perivale Wood, we can help the Guides to complete their winter paw print. We can go on a winter walk and identify trees by their silhouettes. We can also collect natural materials and make Christmas decorations such as holly wreaths and yule logs. If the Guides were lucky enough to come to the reserve in the snow we look for animal trails and make snow sculptures of woodland creatures.

Outdoor homes

Guides can explore the outdoor homes found within Perivale Wood. They can look for slow worms under corrugated sheets and see whether they can find the entrance to a foxes den. Within the wood, they can look for bird boxes and investigate the minibeast area where we have a bug hotel, stag beetle habitat and giant wormery! They can make a mini beast city or a ladybird lodge.

Birds

Guides can take part in a bird themed session at Perivale Wood to earn their Birds paw print. This session is best done in nesting season. The Guides can walk through the wood looking at the bird boxes and signs of nesting. They can then put natural nesting material around the reserve for the birds to use. They can observe some nests from the previous year to see what materials the birds use to build their nests. The Guides can make pine cone bird feeders and can work together to make a bird box to put up in the wood.

In the woods

Perivale Wood is the perfect location for Guides to complete their In the Woods paw print. We can organise a session based on any of the activity ideas suggested on the Growing up Wild website. For example, we could have a den building session and make a bird nesting box. If the season is right they could collect a seed from a tree to plant. When sturdy enough the Guides could come back to the wood to plant their sapling.

In the Spring

Spring is a beautiful time to visit Perivale Wood as the reserve is transformed with the blooming of thousands of bluebells in April. Guides can go on a spring walk through the wood looking for signs of spring such as caterpillar eggs, tadpoles, animal tracks, bursting buds and spring flowers. On their walk they could collect items to make a journey stick.

In the Autumn

Autumn is a magical time in Perivale Wood. The leaves are turning, the squirrels are collecting acorns and hazelnuts for the winter and the fungi are coming up everywhere. Guides can take part in a fungi hunt through the wood and have a go at building their own shelter within the woodland. The session can end with a campfire and toasting marshmallows!

In mud

Playing with mud is always fun and Guides can take part in mud themed activities at Perivale Wood. For example, they could look for worms and other creatures that live in the mud and then build their own wormery. They could also go on a bare foot walk through the woodland, looking for animal prints as they go.

Insects and minibeasts

There are many different activities that Guides could do at Perivale Wood to earn their Insects and Minibeasts paw prints. We have our own minibeast area with bug hotel, stag beetle habitat and giant wormery. They can investigate the minibeasts that live in this area and have a go at drawing them. Alternatively, they could investigate the invertebrates that live in the wild flower meadow with sweep nets and identify them. The session could finish by making a wormery or a mini bug hotel.